I was at a lively party hosted by the wonderful Annabel last week. Her parties are always great fun and an opportunity for all walks of tranny life to come together for a few hours. They offer a rare opportunity for the more closeted trans folk to get all dolled up and engage in ‘girly’ fun within the confines of a private residence away from the prying eyes of disapproving society.

The party splits into 2 sides which are not mutually exclusive. On the one are those that just love to have the opportunity to dress and engage in social conversation with other trannies and admirers giving them an opportunity to just let go. On the other it gives those who get physically turned-on by dressing  a chance to meet others who engender the same feelings and see how things play out…principally in the bedroom. Its clean its safe and its great fun at all level.maletofemale

At all these parties the main topic of conversation is always tranny life in general. Newbies are desperate to find out if they are the only one with a particular bent for something be it shoes, short skirts, blonde wigs, dildos or dogging. The more advanced are looking to share many of the minutiae of their tranny life, how they realised they were a tranny and how their life has developed.

A vast bulk of the conversation is about their significant others.The bulk feel very guilty about what they have done (see my previous posts for more) but above all they all seem to care that they will not hurt their partner too much.

After the party a few of us stayed for dinner and the topic turned to Tranny acceptance. We all agreed for a tranny’s well being the first step is to move beyond what society has taught you about being a tranny and accept it within yourself. To come to terms with this deeply rooted driver that is within you and start to move on to a new life. For people like myself who had so much guilt (due to social conditioning) and had purged her wardrobe on at least 3 occasions this was just a cycle that repeated itself over and over again. It was only after 20 years of doing this I finally accepted who I was. I am a much better person for it, though some of the sensibilities remain.

I am amazed and very jealous of one of the girls Emma Reid (who I hope will not mind me saying is not a girl in her twenties) who over a period of less than 3 years has moved from being relatively unaware of her femme persona to full acceptance, a massive wardrobe and regularly travels in public en femme. She is very pretty but at 6ft 4ins in heels and a penchant for short skirts (who hasn’t!) can stand out. But she has come to terms with this in a very short period of time which is truly laudable and a fantastic example to all who are in the closet and worried!

Where we disagreed was how much we should impose our trans self on the general public. We all agreed that people are much, much more accepting of trannies than they were say 10 years ago. I can remember every time I went out (mainly in London) I would attract some form of attention, never aggressive just someone wanting to say ‘I spotted you’ and in many cases a compliment and an invite ensued. It wasn’t hostile but overt or a pure rejection that you existed. Society’s pressures had told them that trannies were gay, odd and definitely not one of us! Actually I think I quite liked that. I liked being odd and definitely got a kick out of doing something out of the norm. Quite a turn-on!

Nowadays society is much more accepting and its even better. Whilst I don’t think people can understand trannies because trannies themselves cannot explain why they like to dress. Its so much easier. When I am looking at clothes in shops assistants say ‘don’t be afraid to try it on,’ other customers (and I am in boy mode) say wow I would love to see you dressed and best of all I seem to attract a lot more female attention than I did 10 years ago…bugger! So lucky for the newly emerging trannies!

But where we diverted was that some of the girls felt that they are not offending anyone when they go out. They believe people really don’t mind or care so there is no real need to worry about stepping out of the front door and where we go. In fact people are so frightened of offending transgender people that they will never do anything that might come back on them in the media or via the police

I was of the opinion that there were still sensibilities amongst the general public that could be offended. I felt that all the girls were worried what the neighbours would say and hid themselves when leaving the house to avoid idle tittle tattle. So I thought it only right when they were away from their house as the opinions do not change just because they are incognito. I said you should book a table at a restaurant and phone ahead to say who we were just so that service would not suffer when you arrived unannounced. I also said that many gays and lesbians were outwardly hostile to trannies (not TS’s) because again they don’t understand how you can be ‘hetero’ and want to dress..how ironic is that from the prejudice they have suffered over the years. Transphobic gays!!! This is more evident when I go into gay clubs thinking they are more accepting. Instead I get people coming up to me saying why don’t you find your own club, we had to fight for this and you are not welcome!

We really are the last bastion of badly informed sexual prejudice that until we can come to terms with ourselves is not going to be changed soon.

The outcome of our discussions was we agreed that you should be quite unafraid of going into any more adult orientated venues but should think a little before visiting anywhere children were involved purely because of the protective nature of their parents.

Sean_Bean__1566553aThe thing is, people like to socialise with others of a similar disposition and mindset. So trannies like tranny venues where they can indulge in collective discourse of any type! So go to tranny venues or go in a big group and show them your spending power!

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